6 Natural Ingredients the Ancient Greeks Used for Skin Care

/, Health & Wellness, Natural Health/6 Natural Ingredients the Ancient Greeks Used for Skin Care

The Ancient Greeks Skin Care

We have a lot to thank the ancient Greeks for, such as their governmental systems, cultural and artistic contributions, as well as their science and technology.

But the ancient Greeks also used to use some amazing natural products to keep their skin looking beautiful that we still use today.

1. Herbs

The ancient Greeks really loved their herbal baths because they were incredibly relaxing and helped to ease stiff muscles. Greek Athletes were also known to take herbal baths too. Today we too still herbal baths, as well as salt baths which people take to help with achy joints and for new mums to help heal quickly.

The majority of these salt mixes we buy contain herbs and flowers which would have been exactly the same as the ones the Greeks would have used. Of course, you can make your own herbal baths if you have a good stock of fresh herbs and flowers in your garden.

2. Olive Oil

In ancient Greek time, the olive tree was sacred as it provided them with products that had so many uses: skin, hair, body and general health. If you have seen any films set in Ancient Greece, the crowns that adorned the heads of winners or important people were made of olive leaves.

They picked and harvested the oil from olives, and used it on their skin to protect them from the strong Greek heat. Today this is used by people who don’t wish to use sun care products on their skin, it is debatable whether this method is effective, so best check with your doctor before embarking on it.

3. Honey

The ancient Greeks discovered that honey has bleaching properties so they used often to lighten their skin. They would mix the honey with olive oil and apply to their body, this can be used today for those who want a fairer looking complexion but do be aware, honey has bleaching properties.

This combination of olive oil and honey also gives skin a really smooth feel, so great on rough hands or feet.

4. Lemon

This was a popular choice for the ladies of Greece if they wanted lighter hair. They would not have had access to chemical hair dyes so they used what nature gave them: lemons and a lot of sun. They would apply copious amounts of lemon to their hair and walk around in the sun whilst it dried.

This method is still used today for people who don’t wish to use hair dye or can’t if they are receiving chemotherapy or are pregnant. Another natural way to lighten the hair is using camomile tea.

5. Clay

Today clay is one of the main ingredients in any sort of face mask that promises to help with oily skin. We can thank the ancient Greeks for this discovery. Natural clay (what is used in all face masks) cleanses the skin of impurities due to it containing minerals that draw the impurities out. It will also help with inflammation and redness caused by blocked pores.

6. Almond Oil

The ancient Greeks liked to use this oil when they needed to give their hair a treatment as it is great for strengthening the hair. Today this is a very popular carrier oil in products for the hair and body.



It is also great for the skin as it contains Vitamin K, palmitic, linoleic and oleic acid and Vitamin E which nourish the skin from within, so they soak in really easily and help from within.

So we have lots to thank the ancient Greeks for, and their legacy lives on in our modern-day life in the way we govern and our appreciation for the arts, and also in our beauty regime too.

By Holly W.

Shares




Copyright © 2017 Life Advancer. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
By | 2017-10-22T13:42:14+00:00 September 12th, 2017|Categories: Fitness & Beauty, Health & Wellness, Natural Health|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Leave A Comment

Trending Articles

Why Vertical Farming is the Future of Food Production – Infographic

September 27th, 2015|

Throughout time, one of the most frustrating aspects about farming has been the unpredictability associated with it. From bad weather to pests to droughts and more, the slightest tweak in the environment could damage a significant amount of crops. Plus, the land required to maintain productive farms means that outdoor farms take up about 45% of the United States’ land that’s

The Effects of Stress on Your Health and Well-Being: What You Need to Know

February 27th, 2017|

Research institutions from around the world have been making progress in understanding the effects of stress on the human body and their link with a variety of health problems. Stress has been linked to increased rates of heart disease, digestive issues, asthma, and various types of addiction. It is important to recognize the signs that you are being negatively affected

Shares