14-Year-Old Girl Was Born Deaf, But In a Single Moment, Her Life Changed Forever

/, Science & Technology/14-Year-Old Girl Was Born Deaf, But In a Single Moment, Her Life Changed Forever

Girl Was Born Deaf, Her Life Changed Forever

Fourteen-year-old Maggie Gleason is a survivor.

Born with a host of chronic conditions which included weakened lungs, kidneys, a heart condition and cleft palette, she has—despite the odds—thrived.Maggie was born deaf with auditory nerve damage in both ears.

Maggie was born deaf with auditory nerve damage in both ears.

Still, her family has always dreamed that one day she might hear.

Now with a technological breakthrough that dream has become a reality thanks to hearing specialists in Cleveland, Ohio. After waiting eleven years for the experimental surgery to be approved, Maggie underwent a ten-hour procedure to hear again.

The result? Watch the video to see Maggie’s face when for the first time in her life she hears her father’s voice.

Today, Maggie is taking speech therapy to learn how to talk. Truly inspiring what technology can do!

Shares




Copyright © 2017 Life Advancer. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
By | 2017-09-02T00:14:43+00:00 May 11th, 2015|Categories: Inspirational, Science & Technology|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Leave A Comment

Trending Articles

5 Great Tourist Destinations around the Globe Where You Can Improve Your Health

June 4th, 2016|

Do you want to rejuvenate mentally and physically? These great tourist destinations will let you combine vacation with health improvement. Some people travel the world to party. Some people pack their bags to gaze their eyes upon beautiful architectures of the distant countries while some just like to travel and runaway into a tropical paradise to relax and just enjoy

10 Essential Leadership Skills to Be the Person Everyone Wants to Follow

May 22nd, 2017|

What are the leadership skills that make someone a person everyone wants to follow? History is full of strong personalities who led countries and civilizations. People followed the rules established by them, carried their orders out, and even died for them. However, it wasn't about leadership. Fear of punishment and desire to stay afloat—that's what made crowds follow those headmen.

Shares