philosophy

/Tag: philosophy

Alan Watts’ Philosophy, Biography and Basic Ideas

By |2019-09-19T20:40:11+03:00September 19th, 2019|Categories: Inspirational, Self-Improvement|Tags: , |

Alan Wilson Watts (6 January 1915 – 16 November 1973) was a British philosopher who interpreted and popularized Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. Born in Chislehurst, England, he moved to the United States in 1938 and began Zen training in New York. Pursuing a career, he attended Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, where he received a master's degree in theology. Watts became an Episcopal priest in 1945, then left the ministry in 1950 and moved to California, where he joined the faculty of the American Academy

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4 Socrates Quotes on Love That Reveal Profound Truths

By |2019-05-05T23:01:49+03:00May 5th, 2019|Categories: Relationships, Relationships & Social Life|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Socrates quotes on love, like many of his ideas, can be a revelation and a different path in how we approach love and our impressions of its nature. Many have pored over the teachings of Socrates, but very few have examined Socrates’ quotes on love. Perplexingly enough, love does not seem to be high on the Western philosophical agenda since, well…the beginning of philosophy. And the beginning of Western philosophy took place in Ancient Greece. Many consider Socrates to be one of the forbearers of

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8 Great Philosophical Questions That We’ll Never Solve

By |2019-03-12T14:34:11+03:00July 4th, 2014|Categories: Self-Improvement|Tags: , , , |

Philosophy goes where hard science can't, or won't. Philosophers have a license to speculate about everything from metaphysics to morality, and this means they can shed light on some of the basic questions of existence. The bad news? These are questions that may always lay just beyond the limits of our comprehension. Here are eight mysteries of philosophy that we'll probably never resolve. 1. Why is there something rather than nothing? Our presence in the universe is something too bizarre for words. The mundaneness of

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